Corporis Fabrica

An anatomical chart from 1425, giving an impression of medical understanding of the body at the time.

spectacularuniverse:

This deformed ribcage is that of a 23 year old woman who wore a corset. In cases like this, the tight lacing would result in the liver being compressed by the lower ribs and the heart and lungs being cramped into the upper thorax.
From ‘The human body: A beginner’s text-book of anatomy, physiology and hygiene’ by H. Newell Martin, 1884.

medicalschool:

In the fetus, the ductus venosus shunts most of the left umbilical vein blood flow directly to the inferior vena cava. Thus, it allows oxygenated blood from the placenta to bypass the liver. In conjunction with the other fetal shunts, the foramen ovale and ductus arteriosus, it plays a critical role in preferentially shunting oxygenated blood to the fetal brain. It is a part of fetal circulation.
The ductus venosus is open at the time of the birth and is the reason why umbilical vein catheterization works. Ductus venosus naturally closes during the first week of life in most full-term neonates; however, it may take much longer to close in pre-term neonates. Functional closure occurs within minutes of birth. Structural closure in term babies occurs within 3 to 7 days. After it closes, the remnant is known as ligamentum venosum.

medicalschool:

In the fetus, the ductus venosus shunts most of the left umbilical vein blood flow directly to the inferior vena cava. Thus, it allows oxygenated blood from the placenta to bypass the liver. In conjunction with the other fetal shunts, the foramen ovale and ductus arteriosus, it plays a critical role in preferentially shunting oxygenated blood to the fetal brain. It is a part of fetal circulation.

The ductus venosus is open at the time of the birth and is the reason why umbilical vein catheterization works. Ductus venosus naturally closes during the first week of life in most full-term neonates; however, it may take much longer to close in pre-term neonates. Functional closure occurs within minutes of birth. Structural closure in term babies occurs within 3 to 7 days. After it closes, the remnant is known as ligamentum venosum.

Illustration of the heart, lungs, trachea and major blood vessels. From Gray’s Anatomy (1918)

Max Brödel - an observational drawing of early 20th century brain surgery.

Max Brödel - an observational drawing of early 20th century brain surgery.

Positron emission tomography prior to radiotherapy in a cancer patient. Hot colours display the accumulation of the tracer, intravenously injected fludeoxyglucose.

Positron emission tomography prior to radiotherapy in a cancer patient. Hot colours display the accumulation of the tracer, intravenously injected fludeoxyglucose.

A human heartbeat, visualised though magnetic resonance. Note the visible movement of blood into the ventricle during atrial systole, and into the lungs.

A human heartbeat, visualised though magnetic resonance. Note the visible movement of blood into the ventricle during atrial systole, and into the lungs.

Dorsal musculature. Augusto Moreira (1909) from the collection of anatomical drawings of the Medicine Museum, FMUL

The vascular and respiratory structure of the trachea, bronchi, and regions of the lung. Frederich Hoffman, (1902)

The vascular and respiratory structure of the trachea, bronchi, and regions of the lung. Frederich Hoffman, (1902)

The heart and aorta - Joseph Maclise from The Anatomy of the Arteries of the Human Body with its Application to Pathology and Operative Surgery (1844)

medicalschool:

The Morphology of Human Blood Cells (1956)

Dorothy Sturm’s beautiful watercolors are difficult to distinguish from an actual microphotograph (except perhapsthey are clearer and more detailed than a micrograph, and certainly superior to images from the 1950’s). Sturm’s watercolor on paper illustrations, drawn directly from Wright-stained smears prepared by [microbiologists], depicted normal, pathological and infectious hematology with a clarity, detail and beauty that photomicrography of the 1950’s simply couldn’t approach. JAMA, in a review of the first edition, even called her work “of exceptional quality.”

[1] This table showing hematopoiesis (as it was understood in 1956) was the frontispiece of the first edition of Diggs’ The Morphology of Human Blood Cells. Here’s the key to this illustration.

[2] Cell types found in smears of peripheral blood from normal individuals

[3] Blood parasites

[4] Fat cells

[5] Megakarocytes and thrombocytes

Child’s skull with baby teeth and adult teeth, Hunterian Museum, London

by Stefan Schäfer on Flickr.

A magnetic resonance angiogram producing a three-dimensional image of the heart.

tedbunny:

Sigismond Laskowski: Anatomie normale du corps humain: atlas iconographique de XVI planches

Progressive sagittal sections of the head in MRI. Note teeth, appearing in black.