CORPORIS·FABRICA
congenitaldisease:

Decellularization is a tissue engineering technique designed to strip out the cells from a donor organ, leaving nothing but connective tissue that used to hold the cells in place. This scaffold of connective tissue - called a "ghost organ" for its pale and almost translucent appearance - can then be reseeded with a patient’s own cells, with the goal of regenerating an organ that can be transplanted into the patient without fear of tissue rejection.This is in the experimental stage.

congenitaldisease:

Decellularization is a tissue engineering technique designed to strip out the cells from a donor organ, leaving nothing but connective tissue that used to hold the cells in place. This scaffold of connective tissue - called a "ghost organ" for its pale and almost translucent appearance - can then be reseeded with a patient’s own cells, with the goal of regenerating an organ that can be transplanted into the patient without fear of tissue rejection.This is in the experimental stage.

The human femur is the longest, strongest and heaviest bone in the body. It is attached to the largest muscle in the body, and these robust musculoskeletal structures allow humans to stand, run and jump on two legs.

The human femur is the longest, strongest and heaviest bone in the body. It is attached to the largest muscle in the body, and these robust musculoskeletal structures allow humans to stand, run and jump on two legs.

Holiday!

You may experience interruption of Corporis Fabrica’s daily posting and original content schedule in the coming weeks, as I’m flying out for a short break and may not have wifi or time to keep the queue stocked! That said, you may not experience an interruption at all, and this message will have been a little redundant. 

In any case, I will be back soon, hopefully with some some new medical tales to tell. 

archivesfoundation:

On October 12, 1928, the negative pressure ventilator, commonly known as the iron lung, was used clinically for the first time at Boston Children’s Hospital.
The iron lung is a device designed to assist with the breathing those who have either lost control of their diaphragm muscles or whose muscles don’t have the strength to breathe. It does this by creating an airtight seal around the body of a patient and then periodically increasing and decreasing the pressure exerted on their chest, thus moving their diaphragm for them and allowing them to breathe. 
Image: “Photograph of Nurses Being Instructed on the Use of Respirator for a Polio Patient," undated

archivesfoundation:

On October 12, 1928, the negative pressure ventilator, commonly known as the iron lung, was used clinically for the first time at Boston Children’s Hospital.

The iron lung is a device designed to assist with the breathing those who have either lost control of their diaphragm muscles or whose muscles don’t have the strength to breathe. It does this by creating an airtight seal around the body of a patient and then periodically increasing and decreasing the pressure exerted on their chest, thus moving their diaphragm for them and allowing them to breathe. 

Image: “Photograph of Nurses Being Instructed on the Use of Respirator for a Polio Patient," undated

Fiber-optic light illuminates a patient’s innards during a laparoscopic hernia surgery.
Now, the location of the previously invisible target can be marked out on the skin with a marker pen, and the surgery can go ahead without the need for more invasive techniques. The light from within takes on a scarlet hue as it passes through blood vessels and tissues on its way to the surgeon’s eye.
This amazing photograph is courtesy of Stanford Medicine’s article: Opening Up. Read more here about how techniques like this are changing modern surgeries and the people that perform them.  

Fiber-optic light illuminates a patient’s innards during a laparoscopic hernia surgery.

Now, the location of the previously invisible target can be marked out on the skin with a marker pen, and the surgery can go ahead without the need for more invasive techniques. The light from within takes on a scarlet hue as it passes through blood vessels and tissues on its way to the surgeon’s eye.

This amazing photograph is courtesy of Stanford Medicine’s article: Opening Up. Read more here about how techniques like this are changing modern surgeries and the people that perform them.  

Progressive coronal sections of the human head in MRI
Magnetic resonance imaging can be used to develop a highly detailed map of the body, one two-dimensional slice at a time. The result when those slices are compiled and placed in order is effectively a three-dimensional visualization of an object. This scan permits the observation of even the innermost brain regions without surgery. Some variants even allow us to visualise the action of neurons to pinpoint the location of brain regions responsible for certain tasks. 

Progressive coronal sections of the human head in MRI

Magnetic resonance imaging can be used to develop a highly detailed map of the body, one two-dimensional slice at a time. The result when those slices are compiled and placed in order is effectively a three-dimensional visualization of an object. This scan permits the observation of even the innermost brain regions without surgery. Some variants even allow us to visualise the action of neurons to pinpoint the location of brain regions responsible for certain tasks. 

"When I woke up just after dawn on September 28, 1928, I certainly didn’t plan to revolutionise all medicine by discovering the world’s first antibiotic, or bacteria killer. But I suppose that was exactly what I did."
-

Alexander Fleming

on his accidental discovery of penicillin, the world’s first antibiotic. Fleming had left a bacterial culture unattended in a corner of his lab. To his surprise, a fungal colony had contaminated the dish and had destroyed a region of the bacteria surrounding it. 

Unhatched squid in their translucent egg cases.

Unhatched squid in their translucent egg cases.

An open question to anyone who has been to a hospital:

Most of us have been to a hospital at some points in our lives and some of us spend more time there than we would like. If you ask the average person, they will tell you that a hospital is not an enjoyable place to be, and that’s a shame. Here’s a quick primer (or reminder) as to what it might look like to be bound to a hospital bed:

For those of you who have been in that position, do any simple changes spring to mind which, if put in place, would lead to a better stay?

hic-est-scientia:

Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis is one of the deadliest diseases in the world, with a fatality rate exceeding 95%.
It’s caused by an excavate called Naegleria fowleri, commonly called the ‘brain-eating amoeba’, which is usually found in warm bodies of fresh water like hot springs, rivers, ponds and lakes. Sometimes it can also be found in poorly chlorinated swimming pools, but there has been no documented case of N. fowleri inhabiting salt water.
In order for the infection to occur, contaminated water containing the excavate must be ingested via the nose, or insufflated. Naegleria fowleri then attaches itself to the olfactory nerve, entering the central nervous system and migrates to the brain where it multiplies greatly by feeding on nerve tissue.
It’s a very rare disease, with some 300-400 cases reported to date.
Top image: Brain of a female chimpanzee with amoebic encephalitis caused by Balamuthia mandrillaris, a similar organism to N. fowleri. Source.
Bottom image: The histopathologic characteristics associated with a case of amebic meningoencephalitis due to Naegleria fowleri parasites. Source
Zoom Info
hic-est-scientia:

Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis is one of the deadliest diseases in the world, with a fatality rate exceeding 95%.
It’s caused by an excavate called Naegleria fowleri, commonly called the ‘brain-eating amoeba’, which is usually found in warm bodies of fresh water like hot springs, rivers, ponds and lakes. Sometimes it can also be found in poorly chlorinated swimming pools, but there has been no documented case of N. fowleri inhabiting salt water.
In order for the infection to occur, contaminated water containing the excavate must be ingested via the nose, or insufflated. Naegleria fowleri then attaches itself to the olfactory nerve, entering the central nervous system and migrates to the brain where it multiplies greatly by feeding on nerve tissue.
It’s a very rare disease, with some 300-400 cases reported to date.
Top image: Brain of a female chimpanzee with amoebic encephalitis caused by Balamuthia mandrillaris, a similar organism to N. fowleri. Source.
Bottom image: The histopathologic characteristics associated with a case of amebic meningoencephalitis due to Naegleria fowleri parasites. Source
Zoom Info

hic-est-scientia:

Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis is one of the deadliest diseases in the world, with a fatality rate exceeding 95%.

It’s caused by an excavate called Naegleria fowleri, commonly called the ‘brain-eating amoeba’, which is usually found in warm bodies of fresh water like hot springs, rivers, ponds and lakes. Sometimes it can also be found in poorly chlorinated swimming pools, but there has been no documented case of N. fowleri inhabiting salt water.

In order for the infection to occur, contaminated water containing the excavate must be ingested via the nose, or insufflated. Naegleria fowleri then attaches itself to the olfactory nerve, entering the central nervous system and migrates to the brain where it multiplies greatly by feeding on nerve tissue.

It’s a very rare disease, with some 300-400 cases reported to date.

Top image: Brain of a female chimpanzee with amoebic encephalitis caused by Balamuthia mandrillaris, a similar organism to N. fowleri. Source.

Bottom image: The histopathologic characteristics associated with a case of amebic meningoencephalitis due to Naegleria fowleri parasites. Source